Friday, February 12, 2010

Who says that grab bars have to be ugly?

"I would rather fall than have my friends think I have a grab bar!"




Those words changed the world of Abbie Sladick, sending her on a fantastic journey of creativity and innovation in a seemingly dull industry.

For over eight years, Abbie had been making dreams come true by designing and remodeling extraordinary bathrooms for her clients. She used products from all over the world for her projects but when one of her clients refused to use a grab bar - Abbie was stumped.

How could she create a beautifully bathroom with an ugly grab bar?

Never to be discouraged, Abbie decided if she couldn't buy a stylish grab bar... then she would design one. The company's signature Wave bar was the result. Now Abbie and the Great Grabz team look towards the future redefining safety in the bathroom by creating stylish products that allow people of all ages and abilities to maintain their dignity and independence.


http://www.greatgrabz.com/

2 comments:

Jeromy Murphy said...

Those are really attractive, but I'm skeptical of the claim that the "wave" grab bar "conforms to ADA guidelines". While the spacing from the wall and the diameter may be acceptable, section 609.4 of the 2004 ADAAG states that grab bars shall be installed in the horizontal position. Regardless of the mounting height of this curvy grab bar, some part of it will not be horizontal.

That said, I think this has great application for residential projects and the straight grab bars look like they could comply with the ADA.

Jordan Pettus said...

Nice looking product. Looks really nice and should encourage individuals to use. Does the bar on the rear wall traverse through the post allowing for field adjustment by the installer? If so this would really make installation (finding suitable location of anchors) in retro work a breeze.